• 15
  • Dec
neuro
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Men’s Health Highlighted during Week-long Campaign

As Men’s Health Week approaches, Faith Community Hospital (FCH) is joining a nationwide initiative to urge the men of Jack County to schedule appointments with their medical provider for checkups and screenings that could save their lives.

“Seeing a physician for a regular checkup is important, no matter if you’re male or female,” explains Dr. Neil Berry, a family physician in Jacksboro. “More men die from illnesses such as heart disease and diabetes than women. These diseases can generally be diagnosed and effectively treated if detected in time.”

Celebrated annually during the week leading up to Father’s Day, Men’s Health Week (June 15-21, 2015) began in 1994. Research shows that men make 30 percent fewer trips to doctors than women. This staggering statistic is the reason Men’s Health Week exists—to encourage men to schedule appointments with their physicians for checkups that could ultimately save their lives.

The initiative is designed to raise their awareness of preventable health problems and to encourage early detection and treatment of disease in men of all ages.

Screening for common cancers among men are often overlooked when a physician is not seen regularly. According to Dr. Berry, men should be often screened for high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol levels, diabetes and other conditions.

Testicular cancer is a concern that often occurs among men ages 20 through 54. Males who have had an undescended testicle or a family history of testicular cancer are at greatest risk. Fortunately, cancer of the testes can typically be detected at an early stage through frequent self-examinations of the testicles for unusual lumps or swelling, or if men experience aching in the testicles.

Prostate cancer is the second-most-common cancer killer in men, after lung cancer. Men over the age of 50 are at high risk for developing this possibly deadly disease. However, it can be detected and treated through a number of screenings, including prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and digital rectal exams.

Colorectal and skin cancers are two other cancers that are common among males, Dr. Berry adds. Both are treatable if detected at an early stage. As with all cancers, following a prescribed screening timeline is important in maintaining good health.

“It’s important that we make healthcare a priority for men,” Dr. Berry says. “Over the next couple of weeks, and year-round frankly, let’s all make sure that our fathers, grandfathers, brothers, uncles, neighbors, friends and other loved ones stay healthy by seeing a physician and being aware of their health.”

For more information about men’s health and to schedule an appointment at the FCH Rural Health Clinic, please call 940-567-5528.

Faith Community